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  1. #1
    Licensed Dawgs stabber27's Avatar
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    Bob Costas says football's future is grim: 'This game destroys people's brains'

    Bob Costas says football's future is grim: 'This game destroys people's brains'


    Kyle Swenson
    The Washington Post

    Football's explosive image problem found an unlikely spokesman this week.

    Bob Costas, the popular NBC sportscaster who has long narrated gridiron exploits for millions from the press box, put the National Football League's future place in the American landscape in stark terms on Tuesday night as he sat on a University of Maryland panel.

    "The issue that is most substantial, the existential issue, is the nature of football itself," Costas told the crowd. "The reality is that this game destroys people's brains."

    Costas shared the stage in College Park with other well-known names from the sports world, including USA Today's Christine Brennan and ESPN personalities Michael Wilbon and Tony Kornheiser, according to USA Today. The panel, part of the university's annual Shirley Povich Symposium, began with the moderator asking the journalists about the biggest stories in sports.

    Costas pulled no punches, diving directly into chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), the long-term degenerative condition afflicting numerous football stars due to chronic, repeated and untreated concussions.

    "You cannot change the basic nature of the game," Costas said. "I certainly would not let, if I had an athletically gifted 12- or 13-year-old son, I would not let him play football."

    CTE is just one of the many storms battering the league. The season has been a constant argument over players' right to kneel during the national anthem in protest; the league and owners have responded with ambivalence, stoking further headlines and controversy and drawing ire from President Donald Trump.

    This follows public outrage over the league's soft-pedaling of domestic abuse by players. Television ratings are also down: the first week of the 2017 season saw an 11.8 percent drop from 2016, the New York Post reported. The viewership has yet to match last year's numbers.

    But CTE, as Costas pointed out, isn't just a scandal sweeping through the league it calls into question the very basics of the game.

    A neurodegenerative brain disease caused by repeated head traumas, the condition results from an abnormal buildup of protein in the brain that blocks neuropathways. Memory loss, aggression, depression, and suicidal urges have all been linked to the condition.

    Since CTE was first tracked in the early 2000s by Pennsylvania coroner Bennet Omalu, the league has begrudgingly moved forward with stronger concussion protocols for injured players. Earlier this year, the league signed a $1 billion settlement with former players suffering neurocognitive disorders related to their playing days.

    The science behind the condition, however, has only grown. This summer researchers from the Boston University School of Medicine and the VA Boston Healthcare System published a study finding CTE in 99 percent of the brains of former NFL players donated by their families, The Washington Post reported in July. A Post poll published in September showed that 83 percent of fans believed it was "certainly true" or "probably true" that CTE was the result of the game.

    This week at the panel, Costas saved his harshest words for the white noise that obfuscates the basic scientific facts about football's physical threat.

    "There is this crazy notion that you hear on talk radio and some right wings sites that this is just another left wing conspiracy to undermine something that is quintessentially American," he said. "There's a word for things like that, there's many words. One of them is b---, because that's what that is."

    Despite a long tenure in front of American viewers, Costas has not been shy about his opinions in the past. In 2012, the anchor was at the helm of a "Sunday Night Football" broadcast only days after Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher killed his girlfriend and took his own life. During halftime, Costas made a comment that many took to be a call for gun control, and a storm of criticism followed.

    I know the NFL has had a company working on development of a helmet for some time now. I read the article quite a while ago and haven't heard anything more for quite some time. I expect to see a class action lawsuit any day now from all the former players who are dealing with CTE and any other related brain trauma. This is the 800 lb elephant in the training and dressing rooms around the NFL.



    Copyright 2017, Chicago Tribune

  2. #2
    Licensed Dawgs stabber27's Avatar
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    10 months after NFL concussion settlement, most players haven't seen a dime


    More than 10 months since the NFL's high-profile concussion settlement with retired players, only a small percentage of those who have made claims have received monetary awards, with many claiming the process has been flawed and others defending it as necessarily deliberate.

    Before the settlement went into effect in January after more than a year's worth of objections and delays, attorneys for the class of former players had estimated for the court that they expected 665 settlement claims to be paid out in the first year of an agreement many estimated would eventually cost the NFL more than $1 billion.

    Thus far, just 140 notices of monetary awards have been issued and around $100 million has been distributed.

    "The current administrative structure of the claims process is flawed, cumbersome and moves at a glacial pace," attorney Thomas Girardi, who represents more than 500 former players, said in one recent court filing.

    The company charged with administering the claims process submitted a progress report to the U.S. District Judge Anita Brody last week saying that more than 17,000 players and their families have registered and more than 1,400 had submitted monetary awards claims through Nov. 1. Many of those claims have become ensnared in the administrative pipeline with many former players receiving deficiency notices and others being denied altogether.

    Christopher Seeger, the Philadelphia-based attorney who serves as co-lead counsel for the class of ex-NFL players and is credited as the principle architect of the settlement, defended the process and said early hiccups are to be expected in large, complicated cases like this one.

    "That rate is going to pick up every single day. So it's working well," he said in an interview this week. "Is it perfect? No. Is it working as well as I would like? No. I would like more claims approved and things moving along. But you can't anticipate Day 1 every single thing that's going to come through."

    Seeger is the target of much ire from many former players and their attorneys, particularly after he made a court filing last month outlining a proposal for attorney compensation, which requested $70 million for himself and his firm and $42.5 million to be split among two dozen other attorneys. He also requested five percent of every claimant's award to compensate for future legal work in the case. That prompted a flurry of filings from others who said attorneys in the case should not be compensated before the players involved.

    Bruce Hagen, a Georgia-based attorney, told the court that "Mr. Seeger's insatiable greed seems to know no bounds."

    Steve Yerrid, a high-profile Tampa, Florida, attorney, said he has filed nearly 200 claims on behalf of clients and not a single one has been granted thus far.

    "The public perception is that Class Counsel are now asking for millions of dollars in compensation while brain damaged players continue to deteriorate and even die while awaiting payment of their claims as the process is being 'slow played' and unnecessarily delayed," Yerrid wrote to the court.

    While some former players have assigned blame to both the class counsel and the league, NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy pointed out that the court appointed a third-party company to administer the claims process and says the league hasn't been involved in any efforts to delay that process.

    "The NFL is committed to promptly paying all legitimate claims and, to that end, is working with co-lead class counsel, the settlement administrators and the court to ensure the effective implementation of the settlement program and the payment of benefits," McCarthy said.

    Some ex-players and their families said the complicated claims process has only added to the frustration and heartache they feel. Mary Brooks is the daughter of George Andrie, the former defensive lineman for the Dallas Cowboys who now suffers from dementia and requires a full-time caregiver. With power of attorney for Andrie, she filed a claim in August. More than two months passed before she was told the claim was deficient, and she's not sure when she might receive a definitive answer on her father's case.

    "When I started this journey, I had no idea the lion's den I would be walking in to," she wrote to the court last week. "I have lost all faith in justice and have seen the law manipulated in ways I have only seen in movies."

    Brody issued an order last week saying in part that former players "must proceed through the claims administration process," and an "attempt to circumvent those processes by directly petitioning the court is improper." She has called for a conference to take place Monday in her chambers "to address any issues regarding the implementation of the settlement agreement." That meeting will be closed to the public and media and will include only Seeger and the NFL.

    Her order, issued Wednesday, further enraged many players and their attorneys because they blame both parties for the early problems.

    The claims process is administered by a third-party entity, BrownGreer, a Richmond, Virginia-based company that is supposed to operate independent of the NFL and the class of players. Asked Thursday about the process, BrownGreer founder Orran Brown replied, "I will review this with the parties and the court before I may respond."

    According to the status update filed last week with the court, 20 claim determinations have been appealed thus far, including eight by the NFL. (An unspecified number of claims also have been placed into audit for "potential fraud concerns and/or the audit requirements.") Seeger said the relationship with the league can be adversarial but "there's no doubt the NFL is operating in good faith."

    "Just to be clear: Have they done anything to hold up claims? Have I seen any evidence of their desire to deny claims or their interference in claims? Absolutely not," he said. "And if I did, I'd go to court."

    Many of the ex-players filing dementia claims have seen their claims kicked back as deficient, usually requiring more information, clarification or medical evidence. But some of those players say the claims administrator nitpicks the claims and unnecessarily rules them as deficient.

    Debra Fellows initially filed a claim on May 23 on behalf of her husband Ron, a cornerback with the Cowboys and Raiders from 1981-88. He'd been diagnosed with Alzheimers more than two years ago.

    "We just had another decline a couple days ago," she said earlier this month. "He woke up and told me he was going to call his mom and see how she's doing. Well, she passed away 17 years ago. Those are the kinds of things that are happening now."

    Fellows, 60, already qualified for the NFL's 88 Plan, which provides financial assistance to former players suffering from neurocognitive disorders. He and Debra submitted the same paperwork and documentation to the settlement administrator. Six weeks after filing the claim, they were asked for more paperwork. More than three months passed before they received a notice of deficiency Oct. 20.

    "And you know what? This isn't just happening to us," Debra said. "It's happening to everybody I speak to. They're being asked for information that they've already been given multiple times. It's all a delay gimmick."

    Fellows' claim was finally approved last week, and now the family must wait 30 days for the NFL to decide whether it will appeal. Even then, the claim is subject to an audit.

    One neurologist who is among those approved by the NFL and class counsel to offer diagnoses related to the settlement said he has an "uneasy feeling" because his reports are being questioned. He requested anonymity out of concern for jeopardizing his ability to continue treating the players.

    "What we've been doing is applying the same scholarly approach that we do in our daily practices, yet what we're encountering is a real pushback where our judgment, intelligence and conclusions are being nitpicked by people who really do not have a medical background," the doctor said.
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    The doctor acknowledged that a screening process is necessary to weed out false claims and defended physicians' integrity.

    "I have found many of them not to be hurt, and I've reported that. Not everyone is injured. That's a fact," he said. "The purpose of this thing is to screen who's hurt and who's not hurt. But I think what's happening is we're finding out more are hurt than [the NFL] expected."

    Though he couldn't provide any details, Seeger said the number of deficiency notices isn't particularly high and they're "really right on track with every other settlement that I've ever done. . . .

    "If you ask me what grade would I give us right now, I'd give us a B," he said earlier this week. "But I think if you give us a few more months, we'll get up to an A."

    Kenneth Feinberg, the attorney who has administered high-profile compensation funds such as those for victims of the Sept. 11 attacks the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster, said victims and their families are rarely satisfied with the compensation process, in part because "compensation is a pretty poor substitute for loss."

    Feinberg said in this NFL case the complexities of determining which players are eligible for compensation make the delays "understandable."

    "It's not like 9/11, where there is a death," said Feinberg, who is not involved with the concussion litigation. "Here there is a requirement where there needs to be a careful review of medical records, and it's not all long-term traumatic injury or death. It's long-term, gradual harm. And how you diagnose that brain injury can be problematic and time-consuming."

    Meantime, players such as Andrie wait. He played for the Cowboys from 1962-72, playing in five Pro Bowls and missing only two games in 11 seasons. Andrie remembers games he played and teammates he had, but at 77 years old, his short-term memory is shot.

    "He won't remember the conversation you just had," Brooks, his daughter, said. "He won't remember what he's doing. He won't remember to bathe. It's so sad to see."

    And, Brooks said, there's no way people such as her father can navigate the settlement process alone.

    "The people in this lawsuit, they're brain-damaged," she said. "If you don't have an advocate, a wife or a daughter, how are you supposed to do this? Look, if they can beat you down and exhaust you - and your loved one is sick and suffering - you will eventually succumb."

    Found this article's link on same page after I posted the Bob Costas one. It seems pretty clear that a solution needs to be found asap or the sport at least in the NFL is in grave danger of not existing. Hope the answer is found soon.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator zipazoid's Avatar
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    THIS is the issue that could cause the demise of pro football.

    NOT players kneeling.

    Which kind of amazes me as to what offends people - go out and get your head turned into mush? All day.

    Kneel during the national anthem? BOYCOTT.

    Amazes me.

  4. #4
    Licensed Dawgs stabber27's Avatar
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    The games I'm watching I'm seeing more and more conscious efforts in avoiding head tackles especially in the defensive backfield on vulnerable receivers. I saw a beautiful hit on a kick-off return in one of the college games over the week-end. The tackler turned his body just a few degrees and nailed the returner with the side of his body. It was a devastating hit and i bet you could hear the wap noise from the sidelines. Both players stayed down for some time but eventually got up and continued to play in the game.

    We need those coaches from Pop Warner to the Pros to educate, coach and stress the dangers of those head tackles. Also, hopefully better protective equipment will come soon as possible. jmho
    Last edited by stabber27; 11-13-2017 at 05:02 PM.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator zipazoid's Avatar
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    I agree, but trying to eliminate head trauma from football is like trying to remove wet from water. It's the nature of the game.

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